The Style

Our ideas about the design of the new Gage & Tollner start with this thought:
let the space speak for itself.

THE INTERIOR

This was the third interior in New York City protected by the Landmarks Preservation Commission, after the New York Public Library and Grant's Tomb. To restaurant lovers, it has the gravitas of a cathedral; it's both awe-inspiring and historically significant. Our task will be to modernize the building's infrastructure to accommodate a 21st-century business while leaving the undying character of Gage & Tollner intact. 

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GRAPHIC IDENTITY, UNIFORMS, ETC.

The history of Downtown Brooklyn offers a wealth of design inspiration, from three eras:

  • New York's Gilded Age — when Gage & Tollner was built, and Brooklyn became part of New York City. Some of Downtown Brooklyn's most beautiful buildings were built then, like the Fire Department Headquarters
  • The Post-War Boom — The International style popular in the 1950s left its mark on the neighborhood, from the Supreme Court Building to the charming subway signs under 370 Jay St.
  • The 1980s — After the Albee Square Mall opened on Fulton Street in 1980, Downtown Brooklyn became the street fashion capital of the world. 

The good design of these eras will serve as guides for our aesthetic decisions. 

DESIGNER JOE FoGLIA

We're thrilled to work with legendary Brooklyn restaurant designer Joe Foglia to help with our design work. Joe has designed some of our favorite restaurants in Brooklyn through the years, from the seminal Dressler to the cutting-edge Llama Inn. 

 Llama Inn

Llama Inn

 The Commodore

The Commodore

 Dressler

Dressler

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